Guías Académicas

GLOBAL JUSTICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS

GLOBAL JUSTICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS

GRADO EN ESTUDIOS GLOBALES/GLOBAL STUDIES

Curso 2021/2022

1. Subject Information

(Date last modified: 25-05-21 10:28)
Code
109017
Plan
290
ECTS
6.00
Type
Compulsory
Year
2
Duration
Second semester
Area
DERECHO CONSTITUCIONAL
DERECHO PROCESAL
Departament
Derecho Administ., Financiero y Procesal
Derecho Público General
Virtual platform

Campus Virtual de la Universidad de Salamanca

Professor Information

Profesor/Profesora
Ana Elena Carrillo del Teso
Group/s
Único
Departament
Derecho Administ., Financiero y Procesal
Area
Derecho Procesal
Centre
Fac. Derecho
Office
283
Office hours
Se indicará una vez fijado el horario de las clases
Web address
https://derecho.usal.es/staff/carrillo-del-teso-ana-elena/
E-mail
ana_cdt@usal.es
Telephone
923 29 45 00 Ext. 6938
Profesor/Profesora
Walter Reifarth Muñoz
Group/s
Único
Departament
Pendiente de Asignación
Area
Sin Determinar
Centre
Fac. Derecho
Office
-
Office hours
Se indicará una vez fijado el horario de las clases
Web address
-
E-mail
reifarth@usal.es
Telephone
923 29 45 00 Ext. 6938
Profesor/Profesora
Juan Daniel Elorza Saravia
Group/s
Único
Departament
Derecho Público General
Area
Derecho Constitucional
Centre
Fac. Derecho
Office
231
Office hours
Se indicará una vez fijado el horario de las clases
Web address
https://d-constitucional-usal.com/
E-mail
jdelorza@usal.es
Telephone
923 294 500 extensión 1697

2. Association of the subject matter within the study plan

Curricular area to which the subject matter pertains.

International legal framework

Purpose of the subject within the curricular area and study plan.

This course focuses on human rights from both a theoretical and practical point of view, studying, on the one hand, the main scenarios, factors and policies that pose a risk to the enjoyment of human rights and, on the other hand, the regional, national and international institutions designed for their protection and enhancement. 

Professional profile.

Public sector , international cooperation, international organisations, NGOs,  research or academia, among others.

3. Prerequisites

It is advisable to have successfully completed ‘Public International Law’.

4. Learning objectives

Studying this subject will allow students to have a clear and comprehensive view about the main universal and regional systems and standards for the international protection of human rights. In doing so, special attention will be drawn to the role of courts and UN bodies in this field.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

- identify and explain the policy, factors and key actors involved in the implementation of Global Justice;

- identify the different contexts in which Human Rights may be at risk;

- explain the relationship between Justice and Human Rights;

- distinguish between Justice as a tool and an end in itself and Human Rights as a tool and an end in itself to reach Global Justice;

- to analyze the role that Justice can play in the protection of Human Rights;

- to apply legal processes and procedures in the protection of Human Rights;

- to evaluate the current legal instruments designed in the Global Justice and guarantee of Human Rights

5. Contents

Theory.

  1. Concepts of Human and concepts of Right (defining Human Rights)
  2. Problems about the grounding of Human Rights (Theology, Nature, Tradition, Rationality, Legality, Power, Struggle, Consensus and Dissent).
  3. Human Dignity as a fact and as a Metaphysical Assumption (The Social Rights and the Welfare Society). 
  4. Fundamental Rights and Human Rights (Constitutional Guarantees and Postwar imperatives)
  5. Constitutionalism and Democracy in terms of Rights (Balancing Values, Principles and Norms)
  6. Cosmopolitism and Universalism of Human Rights (Objectivity, International Relations and International Trade).
  7. The United Nations and Human Rights: bodies and mechanisms
  8. Protection of Human Rights – Europe
  9. Regional Protection of Human Rights – The Americas
  10. Regional Protection of Human Rights – Africa

Practice.

During the first seven weeks, the lectures will be mainly theoretical. However, three sessions will be devoted to open discussion in order to reinforce the comprehension of the basic concepts of the subject. These sessions, led by the professor, will be based on real cases taken from the current press.

During the next weeks, the following list of practices is indicative

  • Analysis of case-law
  • Commentary on specialized texts and papers

6. Competences acquired

Basic / General.

CB1, CB2, CB3, CG3, CG4

Specific.

CE3, CE4,

7. Teaching methods

The proposed teaching method will be based on a combination of theoretical classes with a practical approach to the meaning and protection of human rights. Students will be expected to have an active participation.

8. Anticipated distribution of the use of the different teaching methods

9. Resources

Reference books.

-SCHIPPERS, B. (Ed.), (2019): Critical Perspectives on Human Rights: Rowman & Littlefield, New York

-KUROSAWA, F., (2007): The Work of Global Justice. Human Rights as Practices, New York,  Cambridge University Press.

-CAPPS, P., (2009), Human Dignity and the Foundations of International Law; Studies in international Law; Oxford –Portland, Hart Publishing.

-ACCONI, P., DONAT, D., MARCHESI, A., PALMISANO, G., SANTORI, V. (2017), International Law and the Protection of Humanity –Essays in Honour of Flavia Lattanzi-, Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies.

-FORSYTHE, D., (2006): Human Rights in International Relations; New York, Cambridge University Press.

-CABRERA, L., (2004): Political Theory of Global Justice. London – New York, Routledge.  

-MAES, E. (2008): «Constitutional Democracy, Constitutional Interpretation and Conflicting Rights», in Conflicts Between Fundamental Rights –Eva Brems Ed.-, Oxford-Portland, Intersentia.

-CAMPBELL, T. (2006), Rights. A critical introduction, London- New York, Routledge.

-JÄGERS, N. (2002), Corporate Human Rights Obligations: in search of Accountability. Oxford- New York, Intersentia.

-KLEIN, N. (2004), «Reclaiming the Commons», in A Movement of Movements. Is another world really possible?, London, Verso.

- KRAUSE, C.; SCHEININ, M. (2009): Protection of Human Rights: a Textbook. Åbo Akademi University Institute for Human Rights.

- MERTUS, J. A. (2005): The United Nations and human rights: a guide for a new era. London; New York: Routledge.

- LEACH, P. (2005): Taking a case to the European Court of Human Rights. Oxford: Oxford University Press

- AROLD, N. L. (2007): The legal culture of the European Court of Human Rights. Boston: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

- PASQUALUCCI, J. M. (2003): The practice and procedure of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

- SMITH, R. K. M. (2020): International Human Rights Law (9th edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

10. Assessment

General considerations.

Students must demonstrate a sufficient level of the required general, basic and specific skills to pass the course.

Assessment criteria.

The assessment of the subject in the first call will be the following:

I. Practical part (continuous assessment): 50% of the final mark.

a) 30% divided as follows: Theoretical discussion forums (personal mark) 15%. Presentation of assigned group research topics (group mark) 15%.

b) 20%: Practical activities on procedural issues (case analysis, discussion forums...).

 

II. Final exam: 50% of the final mark.

a) 30%: 20-question test (multiple choice) taken from the procedural modules.

b) 20%: 2 open questions taken from the theoretical and constitutional modules.

Students must pass at least 30% of both constitutional and procedural part.

Assessment tools.

Continuous assessment (50 % of the final mark): discussion forums, presentations, case-studies, etc.

Final exam (50% of the final mark)

Assessment recommendations.

Attend and actively participate in both theoretical and practical classes

Guidelines in the case of failing the subject.

Second call:

I. Practical part (continuous assessment): 50% of the final mark. The mark obtained during the course will be maintained.

b) Final exam: 50% of the final mark. A 20-question test (multiple choice 30%, procedural part) and 2-open questions (20%, constitutional part). 

11. Weekly teaching organization